note the trees because the dirt is temporary – Page 1
5:54 pm - Mon, Sep 29, 2014
19 notes

rp-presidentshinrasnr:

This is pretty much perfect. Last night Square Enix announced a cloud-gaming service calledShinra Technologies. They’re working with Avalanche Studios on the deal.

(via karanguni)

5:52 pm
17,141 notes
twinzik:


x

WORK

FANTASTIC video at the link, and WOW Madoka. Just… Wow.

twinzik:

x

WORK

FANTASTIC video at the link, and WOW Madoka. Just… Wow.

(Source: attackonmiku, via problematize)

3:20 pm
141 notes
allthecanadianpolitics:

Canada sets lowest standard at World Conference on Indigenous Peoples

Matthew Coon Come is the Grand Chief of the Grand Council of the Crees (Eeyou Istchee) and the chairperson of the Cree Regional Authority.
The World Conference on Indigenous Peoples (WCIP), an historic two-day meeting, began on Sept. 22 at the UN General Assembly in New York.
I and other indigenous leaders attended the meeting with heads of government, ambassadors and ministers. We went there to witness and contribute to a new chapter of our history. We went to celebrate indigenous peoples’ human rights and new and renewed commitments by UN members states in international law.
Unfortunately, Canada’s prime minister did not attend. Nor did any minister from Stephen Harper’s government. Since its election in 2006, the government has refused to acknowledge within Canada that indigenous peoples’ collective rights are human rights.
The idea for WCIP arose in 1993 at the World Conference on Human Rights in Vienna, Austria. However, it was indigenous leader Evo Morales who worked to achieve the WCIP.  Upon his election as president of Bolivia in 2006, he pledged that he would propose a WCIP.  It was the impetus of Morales that resulted in the UN General Assembly officially agreeing to hold a WCIP in 2014.
The highlight of this conference was the General Assembly’s adoption by consensus of an outcome document, which includes the commitments of UN  member states on a wide range of issues. Key matters are addressed such as indigenous youth, health, language and culture, access to justice, and violence and discrimination against indigenous peoples and individuals, in particular women.
Only Canada questioned ‘free, prior and informed consent’
The centrepiece of the document is the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. In his opening remarks, UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon declared,“I am proud that the General Assembly adopted the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples during my first year in office … that set minimum standards for the survival, dignity and well-being of indigenous peoples. … And we are joining forces with indigenous peoples to reach our common goals.”
Regretfully, Canada was the only state in the world that chose to request an explanation of vote. In regard to the outcome document, Canada claimed it cannot accept the two paragraphs on “free, prior and informed consent,” which is widely accepted in international law.
Canada implied consent may constitute some kind of absolute “veto,” but never explained what the term means. Canada also objected to the commitment “to uphold the principles of the declaration,” since it was somehow incompatible with Canada’s constitution.
Arguments ‘contradict own endorsement of UN declaration’
These arguments are false. They contradict Canada’s own endorsement of the UN declaration in 2010, which concluded: “We are now confident that Canada can interpret the principles expressed in the declaration in a manner that is consistent with our constitution and legal framework.”
Canada failed to disclose this conclusion to the General Assembly. In so doing, Canada has misled the General Assembly, member states and indigenous peoples globally. Canada has failed to uphold the honour of the Crown.
Such actions against the human rights of indigenous peoples betray Canada’s constitution. Good governance is not possible without respect and protection for indigenous peoples’ human rights. Harmonious and cooperative relations — which is also highlighted in the UN declaration — require no less.
For years, the Harper government has refused to consult indigenous rights-holders on crucial issues, especially when it involves international forums. This repeated failure to consult violates Canada’s duty under Canadian constitutional and international law.
In his opening remarks, Ban declared to indigenous peoples from all regions of the world, “You will always have a home at the United Nations.” Yet in our own home in Canada, the federal government refuses to respect democracy, the rule of law and human rights.
For thirty years, the James Bay Crees have always defended and advanced indigenous peoples’ rights at the UN and other international forums. And we will continue to achieve success.
Canada’s low standards have not and cannot prevent the increasing influence of the UN declaration in Canada and worldwide.

allthecanadianpolitics:

Canada sets lowest standard at World Conference on Indigenous Peoples

Matthew Coon Come is the Grand Chief of the Grand Council of the Crees (Eeyou Istchee) and the chairperson of the Cree Regional Authority.

The World Conference on Indigenous Peoples (WCIP), an historic two-day meeting, began on Sept. 22 at the UN General Assembly in New York.

I and other indigenous leaders attended the meeting with heads of government, ambassadors and ministers. We went there to witness and contribute to a new chapter of our history. We went to celebrate indigenous peoples’ human rights and new and renewed commitments by UN members states in international law.

Unfortunately, Canada’s prime minister did not attend. Nor did any minister from Stephen Harper’s government. Since its election in 2006, the government has refused to acknowledge within Canada that indigenous peoples’ collective rights are human rights.

The idea for WCIP arose in 1993 at the World Conference on Human Rights in Vienna, Austria. However, it was indigenous leader Evo Morales who worked to achieve the WCIP.  Upon his election as president of Bolivia in 2006, he pledged that he would propose a WCIP.  It was the impetus of Morales that resulted in the UN General Assembly officially agreeing to hold a WCIP in 2014.

The highlight of this conference was the General Assembly’s adoption by consensus of an outcome document, which includes the commitments of UN  member states on a wide range of issues. Key matters are addressed such as indigenous youth, health, language and culture, access to justice, and violence and discrimination against indigenous peoples and individuals, in particular women.

Only Canada questioned ‘free, prior and informed consent’

The centrepiece of the document is the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. In his opening remarks, UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon declared,“I am proud that the General Assembly adopted the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples during my first year in office … that set minimum standards for the survival, dignity and well-being of indigenous peoples. … And we are joining forces with indigenous peoples to reach our common goals.”

Regretfully, Canada was the only state in the world that chose to request an explanation of vote. In regard to the outcome document, Canada claimed it cannot accept the two paragraphs on “free, prior and informed consent,” which is widely accepted in international law.

Canada implied consent may constitute some kind of absolute “veto,” but never explained what the term means. Canada also objected to the commitment “to uphold the principles of the declaration,” since it was somehow incompatible with Canada’s constitution.

Arguments ‘contradict own endorsement of UN declaration’

These arguments are false. They contradict Canada’s own endorsement of the UN declaration in 2010, which concluded: “We are now confident that Canada can interpret the principles expressed in the declaration in a manner that is consistent with our constitution and legal framework.”

Canada failed to disclose this conclusion to the General Assembly. In so doing, Canada has misled the General Assembly, member states and indigenous peoples globally. Canada has failed to uphold the honour of the Crown.

Such actions against the human rights of indigenous peoples betray Canada’s constitution. Good governance is not possible without respect and protection for indigenous peoples’ human rights. Harmonious and cooperative relations — which is also highlighted in the UN declaration — require no less.

For years, the Harper government has refused to consult indigenous rights-holders on crucial issues, especially when it involves international forums. This repeated failure to consult violates Canada’s duty under Canadian constitutional and international law.

In his opening remarks, Ban declared to indigenous peoples from all regions of the world, “You will always have a home at the United Nations.” Yet in our own home in Canada, the federal government refuses to respect democracy, the rule of law and human rights.

For thirty years, the James Bay Crees have always defended and advanced indigenous peoples’ rights at the UN and other international forums. And we will continue to achieve success.

Canada’s low standards have not and cannot prevent the increasing influence of the UN declaration in Canada and worldwide.

(via followmyv0ice)

3:55 am
3 notes

And then it was 4 am and why am I awake.

11:08 pm - Sun, Sep 28, 2014
69 notes

roachpatrol:

jumpingjacktrash:

hypotheticalwoman:

jumpingjacktrash:

roachpatrol:

omg omg i thought of a cool group craft project actually

what if i drew up some simple design, then uploaded it, gave everyone a week to acquire needle and fabric and hoop and thread, then in a stream we went through tracing the pattern and embroidering it? it could be a snake or a bird or something so everyone could fill theirs out differently….

hm, i’ve been curious about learning to embroider, could it be something not too expert? like idk enough to know whether some stitches are more difficult or advanced than others, but maybe something someone with good dexterity and a textile background could use to acquire a new skill.

also could it be a bug i love bugs

i am just full of unreasonable demands <3

Embroidery is easy, honestly. You learn the basic techniques and after that it’s just all about finesse. Embroidery on the whole has one of the steepest learning curves of anything I’ve ever tried - you try a stitch and hey, you can do that stitch now! Try another!

that’s how i feel about knitting, but some people say it’s really hard, idk :P

anyway, i’ve done needlepoint and cross stitch — the stuff where you’re just making x’s or diagonals on a grid — but never made a real effort to learn the freehand stuff.

i want to learn ALL the textile skills!

disclaimer: the only stitch i can do is satin stitch so this will be my first and only embroidery lesson

I would TOTALLY be up for this!

11:33 pm - Sat, Sep 27, 2014
1,683 notes

princefanfan:

140924 叶公子有个幻肢  你好,吴亦凡 Hello, Wu Yifan

Whoa… No watermark…. Thank you!

(Source: allaboutwu, via roachpatrol)

3:20 pm
168,393 notes

roachpatrol:

Historian and Feminist Scholar Gerda Lerner

When women were campaigning for the right to vote, they’d go on hunger strikes.

And what the police would do would be to grab them up, tie them to a chair, and ram a feeding tube down their throat. The clamps and tubes they used tore up the womens’ mouths. Sometimes the tube would go into the woman’s lungs. Then the woman might die of pneumonia. After women dying in jail became distasteful, they’d let the ill women go for a short period to recuperate in the community, then come and arrest them again.

Also suffragette protestors were beaten. Viciously. By the police. There’s all these pictures of smiling suffragettes having parades— they were risking their lives, some of them died. The police would come and beat them and sexually assault them. There aren’t many pictures of that, the newspapers wouldn’t run them, or the local government wouldn’t let them. 

They also chained themselves to shit, they set buildings on fire and smashed in windows, they followed politicians around shouting abuse, this one british woman threw herself under king george’s horse to be a martyr—they were violent. They were met with violence and they replied with violence. And a lot of them died. 

Then black women had to fight the same fucking fight all over again. 

That’s what  I think about when men say they gave us the right to vote. 

(Source: exgynocraticgrrl)

1:29 am
212,314 notes
timelordblogging:

allofmylovetess:

dlubes:

clarknokent:

You know she regrets this lmao

watch the whole video. no way she does.

It’s your juicy jewel of flavor, Ring Pop!

WATCH THE FUCKING VIDEO

timelordblogging:

allofmylovetess:

dlubes:

clarknokent:

You know she regrets this lmao

watch the whole video. no way she does.

It’s your juicy jewel of flavor, Ring Pop!

WATCH THE FUCKING VIDEO

(Source: shogunofyellow, via roachpatrol)

5:40 pm - Fri, Sep 26, 2014
5,692 notes

dothemusicything:

firstturnfold:

dothemusicything:

New arrangement is posted! This one is of Gold Pilot, composed by First Turn Fold. The beginning of the original was used in [S] Act 6 Act 6 Intermission 1, but my arrangement is of the full 5-minute piece.

Oh my word…
I seriously teared-up during this. You have done what I’ve failed to: Arrange Gold Pilot in any cohesive way for solo piano. And it’s absolutely Gorgeous!
Thank you so much, my friend. It’s an honor to be so expertly covered!

Thank you! I just spent several minutes being very excited that you found this and liked it.  Thank you for having written the piece, and for your kind words. I enjoyed arranging and learning it, and it’s very rewarding to read feedback from the composer himself.

If you have any interest, here’s the sheet music for my arrangement.

(via saccharinesylph)

3:20 pm
98,514 notes

milesjai:

ooooOOOOOOO

(Source: amazingxmen, via problematize)

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